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January 29, 2010

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kichwa kikubwa


[snip an angry Kenyan]

No, I don't speak much Swahili, but I know what "jinga" means.

Comment here is free but moderated; no insulting each other, or the host. Manners, please.


Doug M.

kichwa kikubwa

You have no evidence that I am a Kenya nor that I am angry. However, I'm surprised you didn't accuse me of being a Kikuyu, Luo, or Dorobo for that matter. I find it ironic that Kenyans are proud to identify themselves as Kenyans and Africans but you seem to play into the same mzungu divide and rule game to remind Africans which tribe they are.It's pretty clear you haven't been to Kenya or you would realize that you can't compare Kenya to the DRC in terms of corruption. From what I've seen you could compare TZ to the DRC but not Kenya. I would encourage you to actually go to Kenya and interact with people than judge the country from what Ms. Wrong from the notes she dictated from Githongo's misinformed rantings and have those judgments confirmed from Tanzania where people have been disempowered by an autocratic state so desperate for foreign exchange for that it encourages it's people to lower their dignity to satisfy foreign theories and egos. If you've read Wrong's other books you should notice she writes in a very different tone (still with the gaze of a tourist pretending to be a journalist than her Githongo story). It's clear Githongo wrote the book to justify his own ego and alleviate neo-colonial guilt. In the past Tanzania was demonized by the West the way Kenya is today, because it like Kenya today defied the West. The difference is Kenya has a strong enough economy and educated middle class that it is not easily shaken by whims of the west I firmly believe you censored my comments because they expose the truth rather, and its a truth no one will confront you about in Tanzania or in the privileged circles you experience in the U.S. and through the gaze of a tourist.

mohamed

KENYA GOVERNMENT HAS STRONG ECONOMY BUT U PEOPLE LIVING IN POOR CONDITION COMPARE TANZANIAN PEOPLE

Vuminyembe

I have read the post on Tanzania. I am from swaziland and hav worked in Arush for almost two years. I have travelled in many African countries and Asia. I do believe that things in Tanzania do work and that the coruption that is there is usually unccessary. Sometimes it peope offering an officer unsolicited bribes. Even though the officer was still going to perform his/her duties. There is corruption that you meet in many government sevice points ( Not Sweden though). People even in Swaziland they negotiate to pay a bribe instead of a traffic fine. Even when the police officer has not asked for it. South Africa the same. Tanzania is a growing economy with a raising well educated middle class. To me I can compare it with India in the early 90's. The politics is getting right. Democracy does not get it wrong in a long run, it needs an educated mass to be effective. There is a problem with the assumed power of the army and the fear it exert on the citizens. It is more abstract than real. I loved Tanzania and Kenya. In Kenya you can see and feel the vibrancy of the citizens, just like in South Arica. In Tanzania you can feel the determination to progress. There is a lot of mis teaching of Nyerere that the people need to acknowledge with the same zeal they accept his good teachings. Tanzania need to be honest with its past mistakes inorder to move forward with more determination. I do think tribes create wars and social unrest. It is the political structures and biased economic practices. Kiswahili or Kiswahili Tanzania was not going to be like other Africa countries. The Kikuyu or Luo did not have problems because of their tribal differences, it is how political power was used to apportion state resources (eg Land in the rift valley)

Vuminyembe

I have read the post on Tanzania. I am from Swaziland and have worked in Arusha for almost two years. I have travelled in many African countries and Asia. I do believe that things in Tanzania do work and that the corruption that is there is usually unnecessary. Sometimes it is people offering an officer an unsolicited bribe. Even though the officer was going to perform his/her duties regardless of the ‘soda’. There is corruption that you meet in many government service points ( Not in Sweden though). People, even in Swaziland they negotiate to pay a bribe instead of a traffic fine, even when the police officer has not asked for it, you find the same thing in South Africa. Tanzania is a growing economy with a emerging, well educated middle class. To me I can compare it with India in the early 90's. The politics is getting right. Democracy does not get it wrong in a long ran, it needs an educated mass to be effective. There is a problem with the assumed power of the army and the fear it exert on the citizens. It is more abstract than real. I love Tanzania and Kenya. In Kenya you can see and feel the vibrancy of the citizens, just like in South Arica. In Tanzania you can feel the determination to progress just like in India. There is a lot of mis-teachings of Nyerere that the people of Tanzania need to acknowledge with the same zeal they accept his good teachings. Tanzania need to be honest with itself about its past mistakes in order to move forward with more determination. I do not think tribes create wars and social unrest. It is the political structures and biased economic practices. Kiswahili or no Kiswahili Tanzania was not going to be like other Africa countries (Angola, Mozambique, DRC, Rwanda etc. The Kikuyu or Luo did not have problems because of their tribal differences; it is how political power was used to apportion state resources (e.g. Land in the rift valley)

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