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November 14, 2007

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claudia

Oddly, I've been reading some of Emerson's essays lately. Strange confusion of erudition and naivete. He managed to get astoundingly well read, but there's a certain... not cultural cringe, exactly... a pining after glory? The bright kid from a hick town who wants to live in an imagined Manhattan?

Which Indo-European effects?


Doug M.

Bernard Guerrero

Beautiful poem.

"The bright kid from a hick town who wants to live in an imagined Manhattan?"

You say that as if it's a bad thing! Besides, a short while in the real Manhattan cures you of a great deal of naiveté.

Carlos

Using four forms derived from the same verb in two lines -- that's classic old IE. The paired but phonetically linked opposition. The whole alliteration/inversion/compression thing.

"there's a certain... not cultural cringe, exactly... a pining after glory? The bright kid from a hick town who wants to live in an imagined Manhattan?"

Except that Emerson knew that there was no place like that on Earth. yeah, pretty much. Space brothers, take me home!

You see this throughout later nineteenth century American lit. (E.g., Henry James going to London and realizing, this is the best there is? Ah well. Or in a different key, Twain's Captain Stormfield.) In a weird way, the dominance of New York in the twentieth century as a cultural center was a form of settling.

Bernard Guerrero

I read the Visit to Heaven as disillusionment with human proclivities in general more than the cosmopolitan ideal per se.

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