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October 06, 2007

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Noel Maurer

Carlos, I love you, man. This was a twofer. Hours of laughter.

Thinking, thinking. But more still wanted while doing so.

Dennis Brennan

Casting a West Indian as a turban-wearing majordomo named "Punjab" is exactly the kind of cross-cultural delight that I come to this blog to find.

My 2 1/2-year-old, Ryan, is in the "Annie" phase that, I gather, kids still go through. On the other hand, he seems to have a thing for musical theatre generally. He also likes the fast Robert Preston numbers in The Music Man. My wife and I re-watched Grease with him-- we didn't remember how sexually explicit it was.

Carlos

Did I ever link to this? "Musically, Jay-Z uses my melody exactly as written, except for the addition of rap beats," Strouse says. "But as the song was very percussive to start with, that’s not too worrying."

http://www.blender.com/guide/articles.aspx?id=827

I still remember one of the Onion guys playing the first few beats of the bass line and asking me to guess.

Anyway. You know, Grease and (of all things) Xanadu have made comebacks among preteens? Makes you wonder if the musical is just going through a dormant phase, waiting for the right time to burst from our chests.

(And there's the Tim Burton Sweeney Todd, which I'm sure one of my co-bloggers will have an opinion about.)

Michael

Crisp and clean! No caffeine! Never had it, never will! Ah-hahahaha!

I still quote that all the time, to the utter mystification of the (Hungarian) wife and (too damn young) kids. Once Holder gets in your head, I guess he's there forever.

Doug M.


I haven't seen the Burton Todd, and so should not express an opinion.

Geoffrey Holder connects to Tim Burton: he did the voiceover for the 2005 movie version of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory". (It's interesting to note that both movie versions are a mixture of cool and suck, but in completely different ways.)

"Live and Let Die" was my first grownup movie; I was nine. If I recall correctly, my parents couldn't get a babysitter, so they took me along. I must ask Mom about that sometime.


Doug M.

lala

are you so lonely it has come to Jane Seymour?? not even that one chick from Alias? come on, Yu!

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