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April 20, 2007

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Randy McDonald

I think that Alain Peyrefitte mentioned this map in his two-volume account of his trip to China. I'll check and see what's up there.

Vladimir Menkov

Russian authors love to quote such maps of course - and, fortunately, have no lack of genuine ones.

Here's a fairly minor, but recent, example:
http://new.hist.asu.ru/biblio/ruskit/0.html
(It is from a book on Russian-Chinese relations in Central Asia in the 19th century, and is said to have come from a 1979 Chinese book on "Russian aggression on China's northwestern borders" (ed.
Guo Shengwu, Cheng Hua. In this case, the Russian historian won't of course deny that the shaded area was, at least nominally, part of the Qing Empire in the early 19th century, but will make a point that Chinese presence in this area was very thin on the ground, and that the local Muslims often did not have much love lost for the Qing rulers).

Reprinting maps like this was quite popular with Soviet authors of the 1970s and 80s writing about "Han chauvinism", "Maoist hegemonism", and "Beijing's imperial ambitions". Any Chinese maps that showed a really big empire - wheher Han, Qing, or Yuan - would do, the Yuan ones of course being the best, considering that Yuan, being a Mongol empire, although not really centralized, included all of Northern and Central Asia, and a chunk of Eastern Europe too, via the Golden Horde),

I have little doubt that maps so shown were genuine, and were in soe cases indeed taken from textbooks and similar sources, as purported by the Soviet propagandists who reprinted it. But in reality of course the maps aren't necessarily "incriminating" as they may have been originally presented in a historical context - not too differently from a map of Russian Empire with Congress Poland, Finland and Alaska in a Russian history text, or one of a pre-1846 Mexico in a Mexican textbook.

xorms

look at the title:"zhongguo jin dai jian shi".
jin dai in China is used to describe the period between 1840 and 1949. This map just shows the history of China and nothing more of modern China.

xorms

look at the title:"zhongguo jin dai jian shi".
jin dai in China is used to describe the period between 1840 and 1949. This map just shows the history of China and nothing more of modern China.

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