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November 06, 2006

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Syd Webb

Some bonza links, cobber.

I particularly enjoyed the Tony and Peggy Campolo double-header, especially this,

Well I want to ask you, how many of you belong to churches - I won't ask for a raise of hands - how many of you belong to churches that allow people who are divorced and remarried into membership. I want to - don't, don't put up your hands. I don't want to - I don't want to know about your evil.

In fairness, when Jesus is speaking out about the evils of remarriage in Mark 10:2-12 (and He never spoke out against gays according to the Gospel record) we should remember the context. He is, as Mark 10:1 reminds us, "beyond the Jordan" in John the Baptist country. And who killed the Baptizer? That serial polygamist, Herod Antipas. So our Lord and Saviour is, perhaps, making a rare political observation rather than speaking ex cathedra about morals.

So while it is clear that the remarried are, by scriptural warrant, more evil than gays; it behoves us to hate the sin of the second marriage while loving the perpetrators.

Bernard Guerrero

Hee! Well, my Mom remarried, and I'd have to say thet she is _full_ of evil. What she did to our neighbor's lawn when he had my brother's car towed _alone_.....

James Bodi

I'm just gobsmacked that one can get paid for sex when one is nearly 50.

I'm not surprised by the fact that all aspects of this cavalcade of sin aren't being given equal attention. Breaking his marriage vows, consorting with a harlot, buying one of the trashiest of the trashy illegal drugs - overshadowed by the spectre of the dreaded ghey. If churchies where Haggard are are like the ones in Bermuda, this is because focussing on the spectacular but not very numerous sodomite deflects the attention away from the many tweakin', cheatin', whorin' parishoners.

Jussi Jalonen

James, if you take a look at the website of the Secretary Academy (an online Finnish escort service; I'd post a link, but I've heard that this is supposed to be a family blog), you will be delighted to see that among the professional ladies of the night in Helsinki is one woman who has reached the venerable age of fifty-seven.

And she's by no means the most senior. A couple of years ago a woman named Anna Kontula, a postgraduate student on sociology at the University of Tampere, made a survey on the state of prostitution in this country. The oldest woman whom she had interviewed had racked up seventy years, and was still a practicing professional.

I'm not sure what's the general retirement age for male escorts, but I suspect that it's significantly lower.

Cheers,
Jalonen

James Bodi

Jussi, I'd heard of pretty aged women being on the game, but like you I'd assumed it wouldn't be the same for males. But perhaps the homo-market isn't that different from the hetero-market after all.

I'll have to check out the Secretary Academy, if only for the name.

Robert P.

WRT your first point: I agree that a great many secularists, on both sides of the Atlantic, have a seriously oversimplified view of the historical background of American religiosity. As a long-term contributor to talk.origins, I've had to deal with way too many adumbrations upon the following theme: "Americans are crazy because Europe exported its Religious Nutters to the Americas back in the 17th century" - conveniently forgetting such details as the Gordon Riots, the Vendee, Ireland 1798, all of Continental Europe in 1848, the "Kulterkampf" in Germany, the Dreyfus Case and its fallout in the French 3rd Republic, usw.

Nevertheless, the people who focus upon Boston 1630 have a point. While the direct line of the Massachusetts Puritans lead to that most undogmatic of denominations, the Congregationalists, there seems to be to be a very significant secondary line that pivots upon Jonathan Edwards and leads directly into the first Great Awakening - which seems to me to be the point at which American religiosity first begins to folllow its own unique course. l

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